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FINANCIAL ABUSE

I have reason to believe one of my family members is taking financial advantage of my brother. What do I need to know and how can I intervene?

A: You are not alone. According to government figures, one in five Canadians believes they know of a senior who may be experiencing some form of abuse. You should also appreciate that the definition of elder abuse is wider than you might think. It is defined as: “Any action by someone in a relationship of trust that results in harm or distress to an older person.” Types of elder abuse include active or passive neglect, physical or sexual abuse, financial abuse and exploitation, emotional or psychological abuse (including verbal abuse and threats), and abandonment. Sadly, experts believe that for every case of elder abuse or neglect that is reported, more than 20 cases go unreported.

One of the most commonly reported types of mistreatment is financial abuse and exploitation. If you think this is the case with your brother then you should seek counsel from a trusted advisor, such as a lawyer, spiritual leader or doctor. You can learn more about elder abuse from Elder Abuse Ontario:

Visit elderabuseontario.com or call 416-916-6728.

 

MEETING NEW FRIENDS

I am often lonely, now that many of my family members have passed away. I don’t think it’s good for me. How do you suggest I meet new friends?

A: Staying connected and avoiding isolation is one of the best things you can do for yourself. One option is to help others by volunteering, through which you will to meet like-minded people and start to build a new network. You can also stay active and busy by getting involved with classes or drop-ins at a seniors’ centre or the library. Consider hiring a personal caregiver to provide you with companionship, facilitate connections, do research on what’s happening about town and even attend a few events with you. Be brave. You’ll likely find others in the same situation once you’re out and about.

 

PLANNING FOR CARE

What is a care manager and how do I know if we need one?

A: Many individuals and their families turn to home healthcare services when they need support for a serious illness or injury or to help a loved one continue to live independently at home. A care manager can help to ensure that your loved one receives the care and support they need. Simply put, the system is sometimes hard to navigate and getting services coordinated can be a challenge. Your care manager, who will be appointed by the nursing agency you are working with, will help with everything from overall planning and everyday essentials to keeping you informed of progress or changes. Working with a care manager also provides a point of contact with someone who understands your loved one’s needs and has the foresight to anticipate future requirements.

 

Many thanks to Caregiver Solutions for sharing these articles with our community

 

Posted by Jordan Kalist

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