The Scoop on Caregiving

|

Please share with your friends: Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook

ACTIVITIES

Fun and fabulous: Games and puzzles are often an easy way to engage older adults living with memory loss or low energy.

Melissa and Doug puzzles: These puzzles are easy-to-grasp and chunky, allowing to train up hand-eye coordination and creativity. The more seniors enjoy the scenes they are creating, the more engaged they will be when they are completing each puzzle.

Sensory fidget: Fidget toys, like fidget spinners and koosh balls, keep the seniors’ hands and minds busy through touch-based activities. Such toys soothe their anxious minds and prevent them from pulling at the clothes and picking at their skin.

Vintage Saturday Evening Post puzzles: Saturday Evening Post magazines, a staple in many households when the seniors were young, are made into puzzles. These puzzles can help stimulate the seniors’ memories from long past years.

Lock Box memory game: The box has 10 locks with different locking mechanisms. This improves memory skills, hand control and muscle strength. Who said that treasure hunts are only for kids? Hide small surprise items within the compartments inside the box to bring extra fun to the ‘young at heart’ players.

 

QUICK FACTS

  • Cherophobia is the irrational fear of fun and happiness.
  • The average male gets bored on a shopping trip after 26 minutes; women don’t get tired until after around 2 hours.
  • 30% of our aging characteristics are controlled by genetics—the remaining 70% are controlled by lifestyle factors such as exercise, nutrition and stress management.

 

TO GIVE IS TO RECEIVE

One way to feel happier is to get involved in your community by serving as a volunteer. Research shows that feel-good hormones and brain activity increase during volunteering activities. In addition, you will be able to expand your social network and meet more like-minded individuals, which mitigates any feelings of isolation.

 

TOILET TIME

Getting to the bathroom on time becomes more important as we age. Check out these thoughtful ways to help a loved one make it.

✔ Clear the path to the bathroom. Ensure it’s free of obstacles and as direct as possible

✔ Leave the bathroom door open

✔ Install a ‘light-up’ toilet seat

✔ Use of duct tape strips and nightlights to create a path to the bathroom

✔ Place a bed pad in the bed.

 

THE ABCs OF GOOD EYE HEALTH

Here are helping ideas for you to maintain good eyesight:

  1. A) Sit at a distance that is at least five times the width of your TV screen.
  2. B) Include food with vitamin C or antioxidants to help reduce the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
  3. C) Have regular eye exams.
  4. D) Quit smoking. Doing so reduces chances of developing eye diseases like cataracts and blindness.
  5. E) Take a 20-second break from the computer screen approximately every 20 minutes.
  6. F) Wear protective eyewear to keep out UV rays.
  7. G) Speak to your optometrist if you have eye irritation.

Source: Canadian Association of Optometrists

 

3 WAYS TO LIMIT BREATHING POLLUTED AIR

1 Less walking on busy streets during rush hour

2 Exercise in less polluted areas

3 Don’t burn waste – smoke impacts lungs

 

I WANNA GO HOME

When an adult asks to leave an assisted living residence, stay calm and approach them in a relaxed manner.

1 Avoid reasoning and explanations

2 Redirect their attention by starting a shared activity

3 Look out the window together

4 Discuss memories of home

5 Provide a gesture of comfort, like hugging or stroking their arm

 

THE SCIENCE OF CRYING

We cry at sad movies, at weddings, and we cry when we stub our toe. Happy tears and sad tears are basically the same. In case you were wondering, it’s all because tears contain a natural pain killer which reduces pain and improves your mood. It’s actually an endorphin, which is why you tend to feel better after a good cry.

 

CAREGIVER STRESS: TRY THESE APPS

SAM (Self-help for Anxiety Management): This app monitors anxious thoughts and uses guided self-help exercises to reduce stress. You can talk to an online community confidentially for support.

Happify: Designed by eighteen health and happiness experts, with a psychologist-approved positive mood-training program, Happify’s website also links to bonus videos that will cheer you up.

Companion: Helping you develop a more positive mindset and reduce negative thoughts and emotions. This app helps you release negative thoughts and encourages relaxation.

 

DID YOU KNOW?

20% of heart attacks occur on Mondays, between 4 and 10 am

 

Many thanks to Caregiving Solutions for sharing these articles with our community

 

Posted by Jordan Kalist

Please share with your friends: Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *