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Grocery shopping for seniors

Our aunt really likes reading Caregiver Solutions magazine. Do you have any tips for grocery shopping for seniors, or are there any delivery services you recommend? Aunt Claria is getting quite frail and won’t be able to go grocery shopping on her own for much longer.

Britan J., Calgary, AB

Editor’s note: Being able to shop and choose food to eat and prepare is often important to older adults, especially those who have helped raise families or been at home more. Trying asking neighbours if they could take your aunt shopping. Or find out if she can order home delivery from her favourite store.

 

Subscriptions

I just found the article about easing the transition to retirement on your website—can I share it with others? I’m about to retire, and this article has helped me to navigate the process. Also I’d love to get a print copy. How can I subscribe?

Manuel S., Toronto, ON

Editor’s note: Wow—lots to answer. Yes, you can share our content with others. Just please tell them where you found it so our writers get the credit they deserve. To subscribe, visit caregiversolutions.ca or call 416-421-7944.

 

Top-notch content!

Thank you for your article on staying active during the winter months. I showed it to my mother, and we were able to review some ideas together to keep her up and going instead of just sitting on the sofa.

Marj F., Orangeville, ON

Editor’s note: Regardless of the time of year, being as active and independent as possible is a wonderful goal. Giving your mom new ideas will also keep her motivated.

 

TIPS FOR Coping with seasonal allergies

One sixth of us suffer from seasonal allergies, which can cause runny noses, sneezing, nasal congestion, an irritated throat, fatigue and itchy or watery eyes. What many of us don’t realize is that some allergy symptoms pose a risk for seniors with pre-existing heart conditions, asthma and lung problems.

 

Ask your doctor: Taking antihistamines can be risky, given that the first generation of these medicines can cause dizziness, low blood pressure and next-day sedation—thereby increasing the risk of falls and fall-related injuries. Ask your doctor for the names of newer antihistamines, decongestants and nasal sprays that are safer and non-sedating.

 

Keep pollen out: Minimize your contact with allergy triggers by closing doors and windows on days when pollen counts are high. Keep the windows up when in a car.

 

Wash your body: After being outdoors, its important to wash pollen from your hands, hair and clothes. This will avoid spreading pollen around the house.

 

Stay cool: Put ice-cold water on a clean face cloth and put it over your closed eyes for five to 10 minutes at a time to reduce itchiness.

 

Dry laundry inside: Avoid hanging just-washed laundry on outdoor clothes lines, where the summer breeze can cover freshly washed clothes with pollen-filled air.

Source: canada.ca/en/public-health.html

 

Many thanks to Caregiver Solutions for sharing these articles with our community

 

Posted by Jordan Kalist

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